The human body’s ability to heal itself is amazing, if not always fully understood or appreciated, even by scientists and doctors. You can see it every time you nick yourself shaving, pull a calf muscle, or catch a cold. Without any treatment – just time and patience – your body will heal itself: the injured skin will be repaired, the muscle’s normal function will be restored, and the cold virus will eventually be banished. Even a fractured bone can knit itself back together. However, medical intervention is sometimes required because there are diseases that aren’t self-healing, and you seek medical attention to ease related symptoms and speed up recovery. In other words, you don’t always need medication for your ailments, although sometimes you do. In either case, Chinese medicine has much to offer.

Services

Acupuncture
 

Acupuncture

A basic necessity of good health is a good, strong, consistent blood flow. Without good circulation, your muscles don’t get proper fuel, your organs weaken from lack of nutrients or oxygen, and your body becomes more vulnerable to disease. It also compromises your body’s self-healing properties. In fact, decreased blood…

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Moxibustion
 

Moxibustion

Another method of stimulating acupuncture points (neurovascular nodes) involves a type of heat therapy called moxibustion. A dried herb called mugwort is burned near or even on your body at a carefully chosen acupuncture point to warm your skin and promote improved blood flow. In addition, the resulting warm vibrations…

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Herbal Prescriptions
 

Herbal Prescriptions

Herbs and minerals are specially formulated to address specific medical conditions, much in the same way as acupuncture does; however, the herbal blends have a therapeutic effect because they work at the chemical level, much like pharmaceuticals do in Western medicine. However, the herbal formulas come without the unwanted side…

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Chinese Medicine

Your body is not haphazardly put together. It’s not a random assortment of tissues and systems that don’t impact one another. It’s much more intelligent and sophisticated than that.Every tissue, vessel, and cell in your body is codependent and interconnected. An imbalance or issue with one part impacts the whole network.

Chinese medicine has survived for thousands of years because it has found many of these connections and uses them in the diagnosis and treatment of a wide variety of ailments, disorders, and diseases.

In essence, the body’s interconnectedness is the core principle of Chinese medicine. As such, healing and caring for the human body is based on holistic approaches that address the body as a whole not just a single part.

Only in the past century have we in the West become more acquainted with Chinese medicine. And as our knowledge continues growing, it becomes more and more clear that theprinciples of Western medicine and Chinese medicine complement one another.

Whereas Western medicine focuses on symptoms, and not causes, of diseases and ailments as well as on isolating care and attention on the body part in question, Chinese medicine considers the body as a whole unit when addressing particular diseases or ailments.

Additional Services

HERBAL PRESCRIPTIONS
 

Tui Na

Tui Na can be thought of as a massage, or techniques of physical stimulation. It is mainly a supplemental or adjunctive therapy to acupuncture and herbal remedies. In fact, tui means “push” while na means “grab” or “pull”, which many people are surprised to learn are just 2 of the major 28 techniques ...
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MOXIBUSTION
 

Cupping

Cupping is a type of therapy that helps jumpstart the body’s self-healing properties. It involves the application of cups across broad surfaces of the body, often on specifically chosen acupuncture points. The cups are usually glass, plastic, bamboo, or rubber, though....
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MOXIBUSTION
 

Gua Sha

Just like cupping, Gua Sha is an adjunct acupuncture therapy that creates superficial bruising, which spurs the body’s immune system and self-healing properties into action. However, gua sha induces the bruising by scraping, not cupping, broad areas of the body with a flat, blunt tool...
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MOXIBUSTION
 

QI Gong

Qi Gong describes the physical training aspects of Chinese Medicine and culture. Qi is translated generally as “breath” or “air” while gong roughly equates to “daily routine” or “process done repeatedly”. Accordingly, qi gong is an umbrella term that can include but is not limited to the following:
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